Sunday, 18 January 2015

Poetic Devices


Poetic Devices
Rhymes e.g.
Baa baa black sheep, have you any wool?

Yes sir, yes sir, three bags full!

One for the master, one for the dame,

And one for the little boy who lives down the lane

Alliteration e.g
Betty Botter bought some butter, but, she said, the butter’s bitter; if I put it in my
batter it will make my batter bitter, but a bit of better butter will make my batter
better.
So she bought a bit of butter better than her bitter butter, and she put it in her batter
and the batter was not bitter. So ’twas better Betty Botter bought a bit of better
butter.


Onomatopoeia e.g.
It's sort of whack, whir, wheeze, whine
Sputter, splat, squirt, scrape
Clink, clank, clunk, clatter
Crash, bang, beep, buzz
Ring, rip, roar, retch
Twang, toot, tinkle, thud
Pop, plop, plunk, pow
Snort, snuck, sniff, smack
Screech, splash, squish, squeak
Jingle, rattle, squeal, boing
Honk, hoot, hack, belch."

Simile e.g.
Friends are like chocolate cake
You can never have too many.
Chocolate cake is like heaven -
Always amazing you with each taste or feeling.
Chocolate cake is like life with so many different pieces.
Chocolate cake is like happiness, you can never get enough of it.

Metaphor e.g.
Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date:
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimm'd;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimm'd;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st;
Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st;
So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

Hyperbole e.g.
In a house the size of a postage stamp
lived a man as big as a barge.
His mouth could drink the entire river
You could say it was rather large
For dinner he would eat a trillion beans
And a silo full of grain,
Washed it down with a tanker of milk
As if he were a drain.
Personification e.g.
The teapot sang as the water boiled
The ice cubes cackled in their glass
the teacups chattered to one another.
While the chairs were passing gas
The gravy gurgled merrily
As the oil danced in a pan.
Oh my dinnertime chorus
What a lovely, lovely clan!

Symbolism e.g.
My heart leaps up when I behold
A rainbow in the sky
Spring and daisies means youth in Sara Teasdale’s “Wild Asters”:
In the spring, I asked the daisies
If his words were true,
And the clever, clear-eyed daisies
Always knew.
Brown and barren means growing old in Sara Teasdale’s “Wild Asters”:
Now the fields are brown and barren,
Bitter autumn blows,
Bitter autumn means death in Sara Teasdale’s “Wild Asters”:
Now the fields are brown and barren,
Bitter autumn blows,
And of all the stupid asters
Not one knows.

Imagery e.g.
The winter evening settles down
With smell of steaks in passageways.
Six o'clock.
The burnt-out ends of smoky days.
And now a gusty shower wraps
The grimy scraps
Of withered leaves about your feet
And newspapers from vacant lots;
The showers beat
On broken blinds and chimney-pots,
And at the corner of the street
A lonely cab-horse steams and stamps.
And then the lighting of the lamps.

Free verse e.g.
After the Sea-Ship—after the whistling winds;
After the white-gray sails, taut to their spars and ropes,
Below, a myriad, myriad waves, hastening, lifting up their necks,
Tending in ceaseless flow toward the track of the ship:
Waves of the ocean, bubbling and gurgling, blithely prying,
Waves, undulating waves—liquid, uneven, emulous waves,
Toward that whirling current, laughing and buoyant, with curves,
Where the great Vessel, sailing and tacking, displaced the surface;

Allusion e.g.
Precipitation turns into clouds, Rising slowly from the ground. Rain falls from the clouds,
crashing down on the earths soft ground. Puddles turn into ponds, and creeks turn into
rivers Water flowing effortlessly down the mountain. Dams build up, the water breaks
them down. The cycle of life always moves on.

Rhythm e.g.
Why so pale and wan, fond Lover?
Prithee why so pale?
Will, when looking well can’t move her,
Looking ill prevail?
Prithee why so pale?









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